The two edged sword: capital cities and the limits to state centralization in mid nineteenth-century Germany

Zef Segal

פרסום מחקרי: פרסום בכתב עתמאמרביקורת עמיתים

תקציר

This paper discusses the role of capital cities in the construction of nineteenth-century German states. It describes the significant efforts that were put into strengthening new capital cities, such as Munich, Dresden, Stuttgart and Hanover, especially due to the polycentric nature of German society, and making them more central in citizens' lives. This was done through symbolic and institutional measures. As a result, they were transformed into demographic, political, economic, administrative and iconic centres. However, demographic, geographic and historical constraints determined state infrastructural shape and form, just as much as political centrality. Consequently, existing circumstances limited the options and possibilities of the states, and prevented the creation of a German equivalent of London or Paris. This paper explores the role the capital cities of independent states such as Bavaria, Saxony, Hanover and Württemberg played in spatial infrastructure and spatial imagination, and shows contradictory processes of capital city development.

שפה מקוריתאנגלית
עמודים (מ-עד)52-63
מספר עמודים12
כתב עתJournal of Historical Geography
כרך60
מזהי עצם דיגיטלי (DOIs)
סטטוס פרסוםפורסם - אפר׳ 2018

הערה ביבליוגרפית

Publisher Copyright:
© 2018 Elsevier Ltd

טביעת אצבע

להלן מוצגים תחומי המחקר של הפרסום 'The two edged sword: capital cities and the limits to state centralization in mid nineteenth-century Germany'. יחד הם יוצרים טביעת אצבע ייחודית.

פורמט ציטוט ביבליוגרפי