On the importance of using local tests and local norms in the assessment of memory

Gitit Kavé, Smadar Sapir-Yogev, Noa Bregman, Tamara Shiner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The current study compared the assessment of memory with a translated story recall test and its original published norms and an equivalent local test with local norms. Analyses used data from 232 individuals with memory complaints who underwent neuropsychological evaluation at an outpatient memory clinic. One group of participants completed a translated test (N = 126) and another group completed a local test (N = 106). Additionally, participants completed tasks of word list recall, picture naming, and verbal fluency, all having local norms. The results showed that raw scores on the delayed story recall test, and on all other cognitive tasks, did not differ across groups, and the cross-task correlations were significant and similar in size in both groups. Yet, there was an interaction between group and standardized tests scores, whereby the standardized scores on the translated story recall test were equivalent to population mean, whereas all other scores fell below the mean. Conversion of raw scores to the original norms indicated that the performance of individuals with memory complaints was intact, while conversion of scores on a local test to local norms revealed the expected memory impairment. The findings highlight the importance of using local tests and local norms in the assessment of memory.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1492-1498
Number of pages7
JournalApplied neuropsychology. Adult
Volume29
Issue number6
DOIs
StateE-pub ahead of print - 11 Mar 2021

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

Keywords

  • Story recall
  • logical memory
  • neuropsychological assessment
  • neuropsychological evaluation
  • neuropsychological test norms

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