Inducing Mechanical Stimuli to Tissues Grown on a Magnetic Gel Allows Deconvoluting the Forces Leading to Traumatic Brain Injury

Luise Schlotterose, Megane Beldjilali-Labro, Mario Hagel, Moran Yadid, Carina Flaxer, Eli Flaxer, A. Ronny Barnea, Kirsten Hattermann, Esther Shohami, Yael Leichtmann-Bardoogo, Ben M. Maoz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Traumatic brain injury (TBI), which is characterized by damage to the brain resulting from a sudden traumatic event, is a major cause of death and disability worldwide. It has short- and long-term effects, including neuroinflammation, cognitive deficits, and depression. TBI consists of multiple steps that may sometimes have opposing effects or mechanisms, making it challenging to investigate and translate new knowledge into effective therapies. In order to better understand and address the underlying mechanisms of TBI, we have developed an in vitro platform that allows dynamic simulation of TBI conditions by applying external magnetic forces to induce acceleration and deceleration injury, which is often observed in human TBI. Endothelial and neuron-like cells were successfully grown on magnetic gels and applied to the platform. Both cell types showed an instant response to the TBI model, but the endothelial cells were able to recover quickly - in contrast to the neuron-like cells. In conclusion, the presented in vitro model mimics the mechanical processes of acceleration/deceleration injury involved in TBI and will be a valuable resource for further research on brain injury.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)560-572
Number of pages13
JournalNeurotrauma Reports
Volume4
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Aug 2023
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was supported by the Azrieli Foundation, Israel Science Foundation 2248/19, 1934/23, ERC SweetBrain 851765, TEVA, Israel Ministry of Science and Technology (grant no.: 3-17351), Zimin Foundation, the Aufzien Family Center for the Prevention and Treatment of Parkinson's Disease, AMRF (Adelson Medical Research Foundation; grant to E.S.), and the German Research Foundation (DFG; GRK2154, materials4brain).

Publisher Copyright:
© Luise Schlotterose et al., 2023; Published by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. 2023.

© Luise Schlotterose et al., 2023; Published by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

Keywords

  • acceleration-deacceleration
  • in vitro TBI
  • in vitro models
  • neurovascular unit
  • tension and compression

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